The BCO Cycle Challenge with Joe Rainey

We spoke with Joe Rainey about his experience supporting the recent BCO Cycle Challenge from Copenhagen to Berlin with Club Peloton. Talking to us about his daily routine, treatments, stretching and his massage tools 😊 Read about his journey here! Hello. I’m Joe Rainey! I have been working for Roadside Therapy for a little over 2 […]

We spoke with Joe Rainey about his experience supporting the recent BCO Cycle Challenge from Copenhagen to Berlin with Club Peloton.

Talking to us about his daily routine, treatments, stretching and his massage tools 😊

Read about his journey here!

Joe treating one of the BCO riders at a lunch stop

Hello. I’m Joe Rainey! I have been working for Roadside Therapy for a little over 2 years now, in which time I have been involved in two Cycle to MIPIM events and a couple of London to Paris supported bike events. I have also been involved in the BCO 2016 ride from London to Amsterdam.

Having qualified in fitness instructing back in 2014 I turned my attention to sports and remedial massage therapy as this, I figured, was were my passion was. I have my own clinic set up in east Yorkshire (Remedial Massage Hull) and now run a busy schedule of one to one clients which is both tiring yet rewarding!

Here’s my account of this years BCO ride from Copenhagen to Berlin. It was Gary Jones and myself providing the Sports Therapy support for the event.

What time did you get up every day?

Alarms were set for around 6:30am and breakfast for 7. We would be down early doors to help set up racking etc with the mechanics before grabbing some food to fuel the day ahead.

Where were you based for the duration of the event?

Gary and I would be hopping from one stop to the next with Chris Clarke (Event Director). We would typically arrive 45 mins – 60 mins before the riders were due to arrive.

What jobs were you involved in?

Arriving before the riders meant bike racking duties and setting up the teas, coffees, cakes and sweet treats which were strictly for riders. So we didn’t steal any at all… 😉

A great view from the massage table! ☀

What treatments did we provide for the riders?

A combination of soft tissue techniques were provided for all riders. These ranged from massage to taping and acupuncture. Occasionally a rider would be keen to try some muscle flossing which I use to help stimulate blood flow and release tight bands of muscle fascia which was becoming more common as the ride progressed.

Were there many injured riders?

Riding as a peloton can sometimes be a nerve racking experience for new cyclists. After chatting with some of the riders it seemed many had taken up cycling within the last 3 months so this may have contributed to a couple of minor bumps and falls. The constant checking ahead and frequent squeezing of the brakes is always going to result in a nervous peloton. This being said we only had a few minor injuries from crashes.

What massage tools did you use most often?

Being from Yorkshire I used my bare knuckles and elbows whereas Gary opted for the acupuncture approach on a few occasions. The riders who did receive acupuncture from Gary where all keen to try the technique, which for many was there first time. As one rider put it, ‘my acupuncture virginity has been taken’.

Lunch stop treatments and some acupuncture from Gary

Was a lot of taping required?

As the ride progressed we began to use more and more tape. Riders with reoccurring aches and pains at this stage seemed to benefit more from some taping as opposed to deep tissue massage due to the fatigue setting in! It also helped to save our hands for riders still needing a deeper muscle massage.

Where the riders stretching?

Post ride we would make sure to only treat riders in serious need of a massage. The riders suffering with a few minor aches and pains were encouraged to run through a brief warm down routine including a few stretches. These stretches focused mainly on the lower body muscles however there were a lot of sore backs which also needed some attention.

The final destination, BERLIN!

Can you run through what a typical day at the event was like?

After seeing the riders off from the start line, which was around 8am, we would then head out on the road. Being in the support car ahead of the ride we didn’t catch much of the peloton on the roads of Denmark and Germany. Instead, we would drive as the crow flies to the next pit stop where we would be ready and waiting with our massage beds, stretch bands, acupuncture needles and elbows!

Once the riders were in, it was all go for the next 25 mins before the riders were due out. Common injuries seemed to be mainly neck and shoulder tension with the occasional knee pain. After the riders first stop of the day they would head back out into the countryside as they made their way to the next. More food and massage therapists would be ready and waiting.

Treatments were kept fairly brief during the days as we tried to fix as many broken cyclists as possible. 5-10 minutes was usually the time limit with riders having longer to go through their issues on an evening before bed. Massage beds would be set up on arrival at the hotel after another long day in the saddle. Our overnight stay in Plau Am See was our busiest evening of treatments as the riders at this point were beginning to feel the effects of 2 days riding.

2-3 hours massage ensured all riders with issues were dealt with ahead of the next days riding. Finishing around 21:30 meant a quick debrief with crew and cyclists before hitting the hay.

The long days don’t seem too bad when you throw sunshine, cycling and good fun into the equation!

Elbows and smiles! 😎

To visit Joe’s profile and find out more about booking in for a treatment with him in Hull, pop over to his profile page > HERE

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